Monthly Archives: January 2009

Shrinking the carbon wasteline

Residents of Rawlins, Wyo. gather at a local icecream parlor to learn ways of reducing their carbon footprint.

Residents of Rawlins, Wyo., gather at a local icecream parlor to learn how to reduce their carbon footprint. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

Click below to listen in on a class.

Carbon Diet

There was sherbet and icecream for everyone as residents of Rawlins, Wyo., an oil and gas boomtown, gathered in a local icecream parlor to learn new ways of reducing their carbon footprint. But don’t let the icecream fool you, this group was on a strict diet.

Rebekah Simon-Peter leads residents of Rawlins, Wyo., in their Low Carbon Diet, Monday, June 16, 2008. Peters is an ordaned Methodist preacher and also one of a thousand trained by Al Gore to present "An Inconvenient Truth."

Rebekah Simon-Peter leads residents of Rawlins, Wyo., in their Low Carbon Diet, Monday, June 16, 2008. Peters is an ordaned Methodist preacher and also one of a thousand trained by Al Gore to present "An Inconvenient Truth."

Last summer, members of the self-proclaimed “Green Team” took the low carbon diet –  a 30-day program designed to shrink each person’s annual carbon footprint by at least 5,000 pounds.

This “Green Team” represents a growing group of eco-conscious residents in a town heavily reliant on harvesting fossil fuels.

Rawlins is also working on new composting facilities at the recycling center and wind power to light up some public facilities. It just goes to show that even a fossil fuel boomtown has its renewable side.

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A conservation victory

A natural gas pipeline surfaces just outside the Cheyenne Holiday Inn where the BLM is holding their last auction of the year, Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2008. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

A natural gas pipeline surfaces just outside the Cheyenne Holiday Inn where the BLM is holding their last auction of the year, Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2008. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

The Wyoming BLM earned a little bit of kudos from conservationists last December after they decided to withdraw more than 16,000 acres from the last auction of 2008. The withdrawn parcels included 10,000 acres in Little Mountain, one of the most southwestern regions of the Red Desert, also a previously listed Area of Critical Environmental Concern by the BLM. The decision prevents, for the time-being at least, drilling in this part of the desert considered important habitat for greater sage grouse.

Lorraine Keith, public affairs officer for the Rock Springs BLM, discusses the lease requests for the Little Mountain area south of Rock Springs, Wyo., Monday, November 17, 2008. The Little Mountain parcels were ultimately removed from the auction. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

Lorraine Keith, public affairs officer for the Rock Springs BLM, discusses the lease requests for the Little Mountain area south of Rock Springs, Wyo., Monday, November 17, 2008. The Little Mountain parcels were ultimately removed from the auction. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

There were more than 125 protests filed by conservationists at the last auction. The withdrawn parcels are being reviewed, and will not be offered again unless the protests are voided and then renominated. The auction did sell leases to parcels in the Jack Morrow Hills however, one of the other hotly contested areas nominated for development.

The BLM ultimately leased more than 172,000 acres in Wyoming, earning more than $9.1 million. For more information on the lease sale, read this article from the International Business Times.


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