Category Archives: Energy Use

Red Desert’s Adobe Town wins a pardon from natural gas leasing

Adobe Town

Adobe Town's maze of hoodoos remain relatively unexplored. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

Adobe Town wins a reprieve from natural gas leasing in its Citizen’s Proposed Wilderness. The Bureau of Land Management removed 15 parcels comprising more than 14,800 acres of Adobe Town from the December lease sale.

“It’s breath of fresh air the Bureau of Land Management has decided to draw a line in the sand and not lease away one of our most cherished places,” said Nada Culver, Senior Counsel at The Wilderness Society in a press release.  “This is proof when people from all walks of life stick up for a special spot, we can move mountains and ensure new generations Americans will always have a place to hunt, camp and hike.”

Much of the rock in Adobe Town is really just sandstone, easily eroded or crumbled away. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

Abobe Town’s labyrinth of hoodoos and canyons make it reminiscent of Bryce Canyon, except  in Adobe Town, there are no trails to guide your way. Wyoming declared the area “very rare or uncommon” in 2007, a designation that afforded the land some protection, but not from future oil and gas development. Adobe Town has been one of the most hotly contested regions of the Red Desert, receiving 89,000 comments mostly in favor of its protection during the revision of the Great Divide land-use plan. But leasing continued.

The removal in November of the 15 nominated parcels from the BLM lease marks parts of Adobe Town as too environmentally important to warrant leasing at this time.

Pronghorn munch on sage brush just outside Adobe Town in Wyoming's Red Desert.(Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

“This lease deferral is the first sign that the BLM has started to listen, and could mark the dawn of a new day when oil and gas development proceeds cautiously, and crown jewel landscapes like Adobe Town get the protection they deserve,” said Erik Molvar, a wildlife biologist with Biodiversity Conservation Alliance in a press release. “The BLM deserves credit for making a sound decision.”

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Into the Big Empty: Wyoming’s Red Desert goes live on YouTube

Journey into Wyoming’s Red Desert, a little known wilderness the size of Denali National Park that brings the steppes of Mongolia to America’s backyard. Here, energy companies vie for the desert’s riches in a world of 50,000 pronghorn, herds of wild horses and some of the most unforgiving landscapes of the West. Come learn of this place and the struggles to protect it as you travel Into the Big Empty.


Drilling the Atlantic Rim

 

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Wildflowers bloom along the Red Desert's Atlantic Rim. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

  If there was a portion of the Red Desert considered lush, the Atlantic Rim would be the place. Here, along the desert’s easternmost edge, rolling hills of sagebrush, green covered buttes and mountains also hide pockets of aspen and a surprising diversity of wildflowers.

      In March 2007, the Bureau of Land Management approved plans to allow mass-scale drilling within the Atlantic Rim. The Atlantic Rim Natural Gas Project covers about 270,000 acres of the Red Desert, and would provide more than 1,300 billion cubic feet of natural gas – enough gas for about 19 million homes for one year. And the BLM estimates that this project would yield almost $1 billion in taxes and royalties. There are already pilot wells within the Atlantic Rim, and this project will allow about 2,000 wells to be drilled in the future.


Lek time for Greater Sage Grouse

Sage Grouse lek in northeast Montana. April 2008. This footage is available in full HD (1080p) from Steve Schwartze Video. 

 

As winter begins to thaw in Wyoming’s high, cold desert, male greater sage grouse strut in a tousle of fanned feathers and jiggling, yellow air sacs only a female sage grouse could love. The hollow water droplet “plops” and coos of their mating calls echo across the Red Desert landscape. As if the sight of one of these birds prancing about wasn’t enough, males gather en masse trying to outdo each other in front of the highly discriminating and perusing females.

The Red Desert is one of the last strongholds for sagebrush wildlife, including the greater sage grouse,  says Erik Molvar, executive director of the Biodiversity Conservation Alliance. The birds face serious habitat loss and declining numbers all throughout the West — a poor sign for an animal that used to be known for its wide distribution.

_mg_0021But even though one stands a good chance of seeing the bird on a visit, Greater sage grouse are poster-animals for wildlife conservation in the Red Desert. Their numbers have fallen 90 percent in the Red Desert during the last 50 years, says Lorraine Keith, BLM public affairs officer and former sage grouse biologist in Rock Springs, Wyo. The cause of the decline is unclear, though human disturbance likely plays a significant role in their falling numbers. 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently considered and rejected the bird for endangered species listing. Biologists struggle to understand just how sensitive the birds are to development, and this gaping hole makes managing the sage grouse and their environment difficult, especially with growing demand for energy development. But as biologists concentrate more efforts on monitoring population trends, the greater _mg_0162b1sage grouse is once again up for endangered species listing, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service expects to announce a decision sometime this summer.

Stay tuned for more information on the sage grouse’s status as decision time approaches. In the meantime, you can read a current report by the Fish and Wildlife on the birds here.


Killpecker Dunes: A desert oasis

Killpecker Dune Field

A flight over the Red Desert near Rock Springs, Wyo., Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2008, reveals the scale of the Killpecker Dunes. These dunes are part of the largest active sand dune system in North America and second largest in the world, beat only by the massive Sahara Desert. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

     This is where we’re going to get stuck. The Jeep Wrangler bounces into slow motion as we encounter a stretch of dirt road now impassible thanks to a mound of sand several feet thick which blew over the road the previous winter. To our left stretches scalloped mound after mound of pristine, bright sand dunes. Soft sand shifts under the tires. Trying to drive over this bit of road would be foolhardy,even in the Jeep. To explore any further, we’re going to have to go on foot into the Red Desert’s Killpecker Sand Dunes, part of the largest active dune system in North America.

The dunes here bury snow, which in summer leaks out creating pockets of desert wetlands that support countless birds and other animals. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

The dunes here bury snow, which in summer leaks out creating pockets of desert wetlands that support countless birds and other animals. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

     The Killpecker Sand Dunes sit in the northwest corner of the Red Desert, a sea of sand stretching north and west  for miles dwarfing it’s more popular cousin the dunes of Great Sand Dunes National Park in Colorado. Here, 50 to 60 mph gusts advance the dunes across the martian landscape of the Red Desert. Each winter, storms blow through Wyoming — the powerful winds having the unusual phenomena of burying snow within the dunes. These dunes compact the snow turning it into ice and storing it in a natural locker until spring thaws. As the dunes heat up, water leaches into the desert, transforming the dunes into a rare desert wetland that provides desert elk, antelope, badgers, and thousands of birds with a vital source of water in this harsh environment.

     The Killpecker Dunes contain two of the seven Wilderness Study Areas in the Red Desert, the Sand Dunes and Buffalo Hump WSAs. And not far away is the Steamboat Mountain area, critical breeding habitat for desert elk. But even so, the Killpeckers are under constant threat. On this hike we saw people illegally four-wheel driving in the WSA, sand spraying high as the rider spun donuts on the dunes. (There’s a special ORV area at the other end of the dunes.) On another trip we found used shell casings within the Wilderness Study Area. And even though the WSAs guard the area from industrial development, gas wells chug and thump within 100 feet of the protected area.

    The Killpecker Dunes area is one of the areas up for potential expansion of protection should Congress ulitmately approve the proposed National Conservation Area. This National Conservation Area would safeguard about a million acres of the Red Desert.

 


Rawlins, the quiet boomtown

Plastic bags flutter in the wind outside a trailer park in Rawlins, Wyo. These parks sit wedged between historical downtown and new neighborhoods being built. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

Plastic bags flutter in the wind outside a trailer park in Rawlins, Wyo. These parks sit wedged between historical downtown and new neighborhoods being built. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

Along the eastern edge of the Red Desert lies a town whose welcome mat includes a sun-crisped golf course and signs encouraging visits to the Wyoming Frontier Prison. On Sundays, most shops are closed and streets quiet. Homes bake under a summer sun and brace against the punishing winds so characteristic of southern Wyoming. Here in Rawlins, I pulled into a gas station, and that is where my car broke down.

New neighborhoods are being constructed on the outskirts of town. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

New neighborhoods are being constructed on the outskirts of town. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

If that wasn’t enough, as if God decided to play a cosmic joke on me, the gas station caught on fire.

Sign painted inside the courtyard of the Wyoming Frontier Prison. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

Sign painted inside the courtyard of the Wyoming Frontier Prison. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

The car and I managed to make it to a nearby Comfort Inn, where we promptly parked ourselves for the next few days, at least until I figured out what had happened to my radiator.

The seeming mishap afforded a chance to see a town I would normally visit only in passing. What I found is a place that deserves much more care from people like myself, a lonely place by all appearances, but one with quirks and life cultivated from decades of boom and bust. In my brief time there, I saw a town that was both growing and falling apart. Maybe sometime I will get to go back, and actually learn what life is really like at the edge of the desert._mg_01022_mg_0123_mg_01121

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Shrinking the carbon wasteline

Residents of Rawlins, Wyo. gather at a local icecream parlor to learn ways of reducing their carbon footprint.

Residents of Rawlins, Wyo., gather at a local icecream parlor to learn how to reduce their carbon footprint. (Photo/Morgan E. Heim)

Click below to listen in on a class.

Carbon Diet

There was sherbet and icecream for everyone as residents of Rawlins, Wyo., an oil and gas boomtown, gathered in a local icecream parlor to learn new ways of reducing their carbon footprint. But don’t let the icecream fool you, this group was on a strict diet.

Rebekah Simon-Peter leads residents of Rawlins, Wyo., in their Low Carbon Diet, Monday, June 16, 2008. Peters is an ordaned Methodist preacher and also one of a thousand trained by Al Gore to present "An Inconvenient Truth."

Rebekah Simon-Peter leads residents of Rawlins, Wyo., in their Low Carbon Diet, Monday, June 16, 2008. Peters is an ordaned Methodist preacher and also one of a thousand trained by Al Gore to present "An Inconvenient Truth."

Last summer, members of the self-proclaimed “Green Team” took the low carbon diet –  a 30-day program designed to shrink each person’s annual carbon footprint by at least 5,000 pounds.

This “Green Team” represents a growing group of eco-conscious residents in a town heavily reliant on harvesting fossil fuels.

Rawlins is also working on new composting facilities at the recycling center and wind power to light up some public facilities. It just goes to show that even a fossil fuel boomtown has its renewable side.


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